Pay to Not Play

hudsonvalley.jpegAs I write to you from an undisclosed location that may or may not rhyme with “Schnoz Tegas Bravada”, there is much on my mind, and many potential topics to write about.

But, as the old saying goes, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Therefore, on the heels of Friday’s post about the Ports’ ESPN promo, I now must now focus my attention on another recently announced gem: the Hudson Valley Renegades‘ “Tribute to Benchwarmers Night“.

This evening of seat-riding merriment — which will take place on June 20 — was inspired by the tragicomic saga of New York Knicks’ guard Stephon Marbury, who is being payed approximiately $21 million to NOT play this season. It has nothing to do with the 2006 Rob Schneider comedy. From the press release:

“The first 1,500 fans will receive an opportunity to “grab some pine”
upon entrance with their
seat.jpg very own wooden seat cushion. A ceremony will
honor famous bench players throughout all major sports, and between
innings contests will include a Mark Madsen Dance-off and Over-the-Head
Towel Twirling among others.”

The Renegades are displaying their committment to Marbury in other ways as well. In addition to not playing a single game in the month of May, the short-season club also announced that they would offer “Starbury Seats” throughout the 2009 season. The press release explains that the Starbury Seat is

marburied.jpg“a single bench seat at field level which is available for one fan per
game. Purchase of the Starbury Seats includes two hot dogs, a bag of
peanuts, popcorn, a large soda and a bottled water along with a
complimentary Renegades t-shirt which reads, “I Rode the Pine at The
Dutch.”

So, there you have it folks. 2008 is still in its convulsive death throes, but teams are nonetheless already announcing some fantastic promos for ’09. This trend will only increase as we all journey through time towards that blessed moment of hope and renewal that is Opening Day.

Stay tuned tomorrow for, among other things, a chance to view one of the greatest pieces of adolescent American folk art of the 21st century.  

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