Results tagged ‘ Nashville Winter Meetings ’

Job Seeker Journal: Chris Miller, 12/5/12

Throughout this year’s Baseball Winter Meetings in Nashville, four attendees of the PBEO Job Fair have agreed to keep a journal chronicling their employment seeking experiences. (Meet them all HERE). In this installment, Chris Miller does a last lap through the Job Fair before hitting the open road and mulling his options.

Chris Miller archives:

12/2 and 12/3

12/4

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Follow Chris on Twitter: @CMill004

12/5/12: A LAST CHANCE TO MAKE AN IMPRESSION

Wednesday was a long day, yet very abbreviated in terms of job possibilities. I had the pleasure of driving seven-plus hours from Nashville back to the Buckeye State, so I did only the essentials Wednesday at the Job Fair.

I started the morning out as usual, looking at the interview postings. When I found none of the jobs I had applied for had posted interviews, I briefly talked to people I had worked with in the past and wished them well as I had a meeting with a team right before lunch, then was taking off.

As I began to walk to the main lobby of the hotel, I ran into Matt Underwood who handles the Cleveland Indians play-by-play on SportsTime Ohio. This is the second time we have met, and his time he came up to me, remembered my name and asked how my job search was going. He gave me an update on any possible moves the Indians were going to make, and we talked about the Ohio Athletic Conference (Underwood went to Baldwin-Wallace in Cleveland and I went to Marietta, both members of the OAC). Underwood was without a doubt the friendliest member of the media I had a chance to talk with over the week.

When I arrived in the main lobby I met with a front office member of a team that had already offered me a position. We chatted more in-depth about why I should consider the position and the benefits the team had to offer me.

When it was all said and done, I had two offers made to me and two more that were still a possibility. On the long ride back to Ohio I had absolutely no idea where I was going to find myself when 2013 begins, and as I type this I’m still uncertain. I have time frames to make my decision, so I will give it a long thought and let it be known in a final wrap-up post on Ben’s Biz. What I do know is that the 2012 Winter Meetings were quite the experience and it was great to meet a lot of people in the industry as well as see a lot of MLB higher ups. I also really appreciate Ben (and his Dad, a fellow Zanesvillian) for the support giving me the opportunity to write about this trip, as I’m sure there were other Job Seekers whose journey may have been more noteworthy. With that being said, I hope everyone that went to the job fair found what they were looking for, whether that was a job, internship or the fact that baseball isn’t the industry for you. It certainly made me want to become a front office member full-time and have the chance to come back every year.

Thanks to Chris for taking the time to share his experiences. As he mentioned in the post, he’ll be checking back in one more time to let us know the results of his job-related deliberations.

benjamin.hill@mlb.com

twitter.com/bensbiz

Job Seeker Journal: Clint Belau, 12/5/12

Throughout this year’s Baseball Winter Meetings in Nashville, four attendees of the PBEO Job Fair have agreed to keep a journal chronicling their employment seeking experiences. (Meet them all HERE). In this installment, Clint Belau writes about remaining optimistic amidst an atmosphere of indifference.

He then drops a bombshell, one that puts everything that had come before in a new light. Read on!

Clint Belau Archives: 12/2, 12/3, 12/4

Clint Belau: renaissance man

Clint Belau — following his bass instincts

Wednesday, 12/5/12 — SUNSHINE AND RAINBOWS

On a morning where I probably should have been discouraged about a lack of interview action, the waltz over was magnificent. Everything seemed to be a little extra fantastic today — the sun was shining brighter; the breeze more pleasant. I saw couples lovingly walking hand in hand (fine, it was only two couples, but that technically requires the plural use of the word). Along the way, I bumped into a Michiganite (I’m 92.7% sure Michiganite is not the correct term for someone from Michigan, but at this moment, I’m too lazy to Google it), and had a great chat. Coincidentally, it was the second day in a row that I bumped into a Michinganite (come on CB, you’re better than this) on the walk over. As I entered the Opryland Hotel, I walked past a dozen writers that I follow on Twitter. Yep, re-confirmed: this week is still awesome.

(follow Clint on Twitter: @ClintBelau)

When I arrived in the posting room for my morning check, there wasn’t much for me. In fact, there was nothing…again…but who cares? By this point, I was a little bit over the process. I had checked the posting room probably thirty times in the past three days, and it had yielded two interviews. It had become somewhat apparent that this wasn’t working for me. Admittedly, it was partially my fault, given that I hadn’t saturated the resume boxes applying for anything and everything. However, I did apply for every job I considered myself a reasonable candidate for (27 total, if you’re keeping track), and it was relatively obvious that a  35-year old with no four-year degree and a mixed bag of tricks experience-wise wasn’t what the majority of the teams are looking for. If my resume was a child, its parents would probably try to lose it in the mall.

My main goals today were to make myself available whenever my previous interviewer wanted to meet for my third round interview, and to see as many baseball people as I could. So I set up camp outside of the main press conference room and kept my head on a swivel. Believe me, that was absolutely necessary. The stars of the industry were appearing fast and furious, and naming all of the people I saw would require a completely different blog. I know I’ve mentioned it many times in past entries, but the Winter Meetings truly are baseball nerd heaven.

As I roamed around the hotel, I made sure to keep checking my phone in case it A) was ringing and I couldn’t hear it or B) if I had gotten a text and I missed the notification tone. As the noon hour passed paranoia began to set in, so I returned to the workroom, where I could focus on staring at my phone. On a general level, the workroom was light in both population and enthusiasm. The same conversations of “How’s your day going?” and “Had any interviews lately?” were growing tired. While I was genuinely excited for those who were continuing to have interviews, I was concerned by how I went from definitely getting a call to meet with the general manager and owner of a team to not even deserving of a call/text to tell me they were going in a “different direction.” Having concluded an hour or so of analyzing every second of conversation that had previously taken place I was left a bit baffled, but determined to turn this afternoon around.

I returned to the scene of the real action on this day — the main lobby outside of the media room. After all, today was supposed to be a big day for trades and signings. Within seconds, I was rubbing elbows with Joe Girardi, Mike Scoscia, Terry Francona and David Wright. I shook hands with Tim Kurkjian, Kevin Millar and the master of awesome, Peter Gammons. (And so concludes the name dropping portion of the program.) What I’m sloppily attempting to convey is that, although the Job Fair portion of this week turned out to be a bit more miss than hit for me, the reasons I was able to qualify this as one of the best weeks of my life were many.

Now before you start feeling too sorry for me, I do have a bit of information to share with the group. After months of obsessing over several job listing websites, sending out over 90 cover letters and resumes and hoping for a bite, last Friday I received a call from the Birmingham Barons to set up a phone interview. The initial interview went extremely well, and led to a second interview mere hours later. The second interview went equally as well, and led to a third call just one hour later. That third call was a job offer in baseball operations. Completely stunned by the immediacy of that particular interview process, I didn’t have an answer at the time. I was twelve hours from leaving for Nashville, and my mind was in several different places at the same time. I have since accepted that offer, and will be joining the Birmingham Barons staff next month. (editor’s note: !!!) I wanted to go through this week as if that offer did not exist, but now that the Job Fair process has concluded I thought it was relevant information to share.

Since I will be creating an additional post in the coming days that will wrap up my Job Fair experience, I am hesitant to come to any total conclusion about what my feelings were on the process (as they may change slightly with a little distance). However, if you asked me to rate the value of the Job Fair experience at this moment, my answer would be “whatever the highest rating available is, go one notch higher than that.” For anyone who is attempting to break into this industry, no matter your age or background, this Job Fair is a must. The experience I had here was invaluable, and although it didn’t directly lead to any job offers, it certainly did allow me to make this dream of a career in baseball feel real and attainable.  I hope my story was at the very least readable, with the hope that it was actually interesting. Alright, bring it in…group hug, then lets all get outta here. Thanks for reading.

And thank you, Clint, for writing — and congrats on the job! Stay tuned for a final wrap-up post from Clint next week.

benjamin.hill@mlb.com

twitter.com/bensbiz

Job Seeker Journal: Linda Le, 12/4/12

Throughout this year’s Baseball Winter Meetings in Nashville, four attendees of the PBEO Job Fair have agreed to keep a journal chronicling their employment seeking experiences. (Meet them all HERE). In this installment, Linda Le thinks outside of the box, makes connections, and plays the drinking game.

Linda’s first entry can be found HERE.

lindale

Tuesday, 12/4/12: GOING BEYOND THE JOB FAIR

Upon arriving to the interview schedule room to check up on any of the postings I had applied to, the same organized chaos ensued, the same disappointed faces appeared and the pacing back and forth from room to room continued.

Most of the positions I had applied to at this point were still not posted for scheduled interviews with the exception of one. I was disappointed to not see my name listed, but I still proceeded to email the contact for the team to send my regards.

There was actually one posting that I didn’t apply to originally and instead of going through the process of submitting my resume I decided to email the contact listed on the posting, which happened to be the GM for the team. This paid off as I got a quick turnaround time of a response in regards to setting up an interview for the next day.

During the afternoon as well I made time to email a couple of contacts over at the Major League team in my hometown, specifically in regards to being involved in the charity foundation that is set up in the organization. Not only was I provided with more information on the volunteer program that was being formalized but I was also added to the list of participants for the upcoming season.

This adheres to the notion that you don’t necessarily need to go through the conventional ways of pursuing an opportunity – think outside of the box. Always make opportunities happen rather than waiting for them. I believe in having the mentality of always trying to hustle and selling yourself – if you can’t sell yourself, how do you expect to be apart of an organization that revolves around the business of selling?

Another aspect of the day was meeting several job seekers who decided that the idea of working in professional baseball was not so favorable to them anymore. One individual stated that the possible sacrifices that may be made, especially being a female in the industry, was too much of a toll for her to continue her pursuit in professional baseball. Looking back at the Business of Baseball Workshop, Pat O’Conner indicated that some people who were here for the job fair will find out that perhaps working in baseball is not ideal which is perfectly fine – better to know now than to invest so much time and effort in an industry you will not enjoy.

The end of the night was capped off like every other night so far here at the Winter Meetings: drinking and more drinking. Earlier I talked about the waiting game, but it’s the drinking game that seems more appropriate here at the Gaylord Opryland – my favorite is to drink every time I see a male attendee of the Winter Meetings. It’s within these settings that are perfect for making great connections within the industry and it’s also a way for industry people to see you in a social setting because to be apart of a baseball organization is to take on a new family and when someone can see you in that perspective, it’s always appreciated.

Clearly, this narrative has not reached its conclusion. Stay tuned for the sure-to-be engrossing next installment of Linda’s job-seeking adventures.

benjamin.hill@mlb.com

twitter.com/bensbiz

Job Seeker Journal: Eric Schmitz, 12/2 &12/3/12

schmitz

Throughout this year’s Baseball Winter Meetings in Nashville, four attendees of the PBEO Job Fair have agreed to keep a journal chronicling their employment seeking experiences. (Meet them all HERE.) In this installment Eric Schmitz recaps his first two days in the Music City.

It took a long journey to get to Nashville, but I can’t say there’s a city I’d rather have this year’s event in regards to my current situation. For me personally, being able to reconnect with my colleagues locally and throughout MiLB while trying to make my way into the industry makes things so much easier. I’m familiar with the area, and this being my third Winter Meetings, I know the ropes heading in. It’s almost like home-field advantage. While having an advantage is nice, the results are what matters.

The whole shindig got under way at Sunday’s Business of Baseball Workshop, which is probably the best reality check most job seekers are going to get prior to the PBEO Job Fair. This year’s was great — Rob Crain and the speakers did a fantastic job of being entertaining while getting the message across (which is basically the entire concept of Minor League Baseball). Being my third trip to the event but having a year away from the game, it was a good refresher to attend, albeit redundant to hear the same stories and speakers. Even though I know the situation well, the emcee Mr. Crain, Martie Cordaro, Elizabeth Martin, Giovanni Hernandez, the panel, “Parney” and Pat O’Conner were all great. I ran into Rob in the hallway between sessions and busted his chops about it being the third time I heard his Brian Cashman story, but honestly, he can keep telling it every year because it’s part of what this week is all about: meeting people and networking.

I made sure I attended the workshop because I knew I had to be able to get into the job posting room as it opened, since some teams will collect resumes Sunday night and post interview schedules first thing Monday morning. In past years, with less experience in my repertoire, I submitted a large number of resumes in the mindset of “throw enough crap at a wall and see what sticks,” and I’d end up with more interviews than I knew what to do with. This time around, I’ve been a bit more selective, because while I’m definitely motivated to do what it takes to get a career, not just a job, in the industry, I have a sense of what places and situations I can be successful in.

So after dropping in my resumes, I headed back to the hotel to change and grab food, then it was back to Opryland to do what is probably the most underappreciated yet crucial part of the job seeker role: hitting the hotel bars. I headed over with one of my former co-workers with the Sounds here in Nashville, Kevin Samborski, and another job seeker, Leon de Winter, to have a few drinks and start meeting people. Over a few beers, I made more connections than I would’ve even had a chance to do all day. It might seem a little misleading to some to act like drinking is what the Winter Meetings are all about, but really, the networking you do outside of the daily events is how you become part of the community. You’ll meet people this week that you’ll stay in contact with for the rest of your life, whether you work with the same team as them, or the same league as them, or the same organization as them, or not at all. And that connection is why this industry is the best.

After a late night (not too late, but late… I’d say “productive,” but irregardless…) I came back to Opryland Monday morning as the Job Fair and the Winter Meetings in general got into full swing. I checked the job posting room and battled the swarm around the two bulletin boards they decided to post everything at and tossed in a few resumes. Then I went and checked the interview posting room to look for my name but no dice.

I headed back into the posting room to see if the crowd died down, and as I’m looking at the board, my phone starts ringing. It was someone from one of the teams I submitted a resume for Sunday night, asking me to sit down for an interview, like… now. So I said “Sure,” and my first thought was, naturally, “What job did I apply for with these guys?” So as I’m walking to the lobby to meet these people I may be working with for the next few years or more of my life, I’m rifling through my notes to find the job title of what I applied for. I found them, sat down, had an interview which to me seemed to be a good one, and that was it. Such is life at the Job Fair. Always be ready.

The interview was early on in the morning, and the rest of the day crawled by. Nothing popped up before lunch time, and I met up with a bunch of guys from the Sounds and walked over to the Opry Mills mall to get some food. It was great catching up with them. One of the downfalls of breaking into the industry is that you’re likely going to be moving around, so you’ll spend summers being with people up to 18 hours a day (work plus after work drinks) and then you move on or they move on and you don’t get to see them as much. For veterans of the industry, that’s why the Winter Meetings is so much fun. This is the one time of year when you get to see the people you used to work with and have a good time.

Monday afternoon consisted of bunkering down in the Job Fair workroom and sitting and chatting with other job seekers while we all waited for more postings. Sitting down at a random table and shooting the breeze with people, waiting for my phone to charge, ended up being an alright way to pass the afternoon. I ended up having my name show up on a few more interview schedules, but everything was for Tuesday. So I headed back to the hotel, got out of my suit and shot right back over to Opryland for the night. The Baseball Trade Show opened Monday night, which is a can’t miss event. And, no, not just because of the free drinks. The trade show is a great place to make connections with the suppliers who you’ll eventually be working with once you’re an established professional. Meeting these people, seeing the products, which includes every item imaginable that a baseball team would need to operate, is eye-opening for many.

After that, I headed over to the sports bar here with a few people and ended up hanging out all night. Of course a bunch of guys from the Sounds were there as well (thanks to Assistant GM Doug Scopel for buying the first round) and as the night went on, I caught up with new faces and old. I was lucky to have a chance to get a drink with Clint, one of the other journaling job seekers and the very talented proprietor of this Ben’s Biz Blog as well. I called it a night relatively early thanks to having an early interview on the docket Tuesday. So we’ll see how that goes. I’ll be sure to tell you all about it.

There will be much more to come from Eric and our other three job seekers throughout the week. In the meantime, my own recap of Day One of the Winter Meetings can be found HERE. 

benjamin.hill@mlb.com

twitter.com/bensbiz

Thinking About the Winter Meetings

I’ve been pontificating quite a bit about Minor League re-branding efforts over the past several weeks, and a significant one was unveiled this past Saturday in the form of the Reading Fightin Phillies. (read all about it HERE).

But let’s change the pace up a bit. In a little less than two weeks, I will be traveling to Nashville’s Gaylord Opryland Hotel for the Baseball Winter Meetings. Yes, a return to the dome! I definitely won’t be having any sort of anxiety attack related to the antiseptic and vaguely alien surroundings, no siree Bob!

The Gaylord Opryland, not to be confused with Perry.

2012 marks my sixth Winter Meetings, and by this point I’ve developed a bit of a routine: attend the Bob Freitas business seminar on Monday, explore the Trade Show on Tuesday and check in on the PBEO Job Fair on Wednesday. It’s not a bad routine, as routines go, and I am proud of the fact that I can consistently provide a fresh perspective on what it means to attend the Winter Meetings. (While MLB wheelings and dealings get all of the ink, a far greater degree of the business attended to involves the Minors: it’s a non-stop barrage of networking, hiring, buying, planning, scheming, dreaming and, of course, boozing.)

Searching for deliverance, 2011

HOWEVER! I nonetheless would like to freshen things up a bit, while expanding the ways in which I cover this event. Here are three of the ideas that have materialized within my brainspace thus far:

Job Seeker Journal — Are you a first-time Winter Meetings attendee, looking to land your first job within the competitive world of professional baseball? If so, would you like to keep a journal of the experience (from initial expectations to final results or lack thereof) that would run on MiLB.com and/or this blog? Let me know – benjamin.hill@mlb.com

Trade Show Vendor Profile – First time exhibitor at the Trade Show? I think it would be interesting to cover the origin of the product in question, development of the company thus far, and the expectations regarding this, your inaugural Winter Meetings appearance.

Instant Interview — Are you going to be at the Meetings, and, if so, would you like to share your reasons for being? Send me an email and we’ll find time for a short interview within Opryland’s vast confines that will later be posted on this blog. This is open to ANYONE attending.

Schmoozing in Orlando, 2010

But most importantly — what about YOU, a loyal blog reader who presumably will NOT be in Nashville.  What aspects of the Winter Meetings do you find interesting, or would you like to read more about? Let me know, and I’ll do my best to pursue. The bottom line is, as always, to provide the best content that I can for my readership!

Finally, as those of you who have attended the Winter Meetings are aware, they are a big-time opportunity for networking (or, stated less elegantly but more accurately: schmoozing). One of the biggest benefits of attending, for me and many others, it to meet new people and to “put the name to the face” of those who I have only dealt with via phone/email/Twitter/etc.

So, please, make sure to say hello! I’ll do my best to brave the hotel lobby hordes each evening, in the interest of engaging with as many people as possible, and am always amenable to conversation. The recognition I receive in Nashville, however paltry, will be used as ego-fuel to get me through the lean winter months ahead. Trust me, it’s needed.

So there you go. The Winter Meetings. They are coming up. I will write about them. I hope that you will find value in what I write.

benjamin.hill@mlb.com

twitter.com/bensbiz

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