Results tagged ‘ Spam Artisans ’

Coast to Coast Canned Meat Carving

Spam.jpgOne might think that I’ve already fulfilled my Spam Carving blogging quota for the 2010 campaign, and that additional posts on the subject would be gratuitous at best and offensive at worst.

Well, one would be wrong. For I have received a copiously detailed missive from the wilds of Northern California, documenting in painstaking detail the canned-meat sculpting competition that was recently staged by the Modesto Nuts. This momentous event made it clear that Spam Carving can thrive within West Coast ballparks, far removed from its Reading, PA origins.

Nuts’ director of marketing and public relations Christa Parr explains that the competition was comprised of five one-person “teams”, who had “20 toothpicks, a knife, a fork, salt and pepper packets, and 30 minutes to make their greatest Spam carving epiphany a reality.”

This Spam competition, like all others, began with the sound of the preservative-laden product oozing out of its restrictive confines:

Modesto_Spam_sound.JPG

And after the 30 minutes of intense artistic concentration were up, here is what had been created.

Team 1: “I’m With the Band”

I call this a “Spamplifier”:

Modesto_Spam_Team1.JPG

Team 2: “The Party House” 

Parr notes that this work was created by a 10-year-old, who thoughtfully constructed a house-sized giant next to said house.

Modesto_Spam_Team2.JPG

Team 3: “The Mystery (Meat) Machine”

It may be unclear from the picture, but the artisan behind this one actually constructed roadside scenery (including trees and a billboard).

Modesto_Spam_Team3.JPG

Team 4: “Spam Stonehenge”

Parr relayed an anecdote about how an onlooker criticized Spam Stonehenge, noting that it “had been done to death.” I’d like to think that I contributed to this perception, having featured a “Stonehenge-looking thing” in a previous Spam carving blog post.

Modesto_Spam_Team4.JPG

Team 5: “Untitled”

My own title for this is “Lobster God”.

Modesto_Spam_Team5.JPG

I would have voted for “Lobster God” as my favorite, but unfortunately I was not in attendance. As it turned out, The Mystery (Meat) Machine earned top honors, with Party House edging out Spam Stonehenge in a closely-contested race for second.

80% of the competitors, along with 80% of the Spam creations:

Modesto_Spam_GroupShot.JPG

That’ll do it for this, my latest round of Spam Carving coverage. I’ve got some excellent, non-Spam content lined up for the next two days, but after that the well is dry. Fill it up!

benjamin.hill@mlb.com
twitter.com/bensbiz

Canned Meat Artisans Shine Once More

Friday’s Will Ferrell post was linked widely en route to penetrating the national consciousness, meaning that a whole new audience impatiently scanned my writing in search of entertaining pictures and videos.

What a thrill.

Things have finally returned to normal, signifying that I can once again pander to my base of regular readers. And if there’s one thing I know that base enjoys, it’s this:   

Reading -- Spam2010_3.JPG

Spam Carving.

The above masterpiece (and that’s not a word I use lightly) emerged as the winner in the Reading Phillies’ third annual Spam Carving Contest. “Screwball’s Spamtastic Opportunity House” was sculpted by emerging artisans Angie O’Hara and Emily McGranahan, who took home a $250 prize for their efforts.

The sculpture’s title references both the R-Phils primary mascot (Screwball) and the charity that benefited from the Spam carving (Opportunity House). The entry fee was $5 per person, with the top entries displayed on the field later in the evening.

The following pictures dramatically illustrate how exposure to the elements will quickly transform Spam’s appealing pink-tinged luster to a distressingly monochrome shade of brown.

 The Talent and Their Creations

update: Sue, the mastermind behind the blog “Rants, Raves and Random Thoughts”, wrote in to say that the following pic features her and her daughter (center). Read all about it HERE, as part of an excellent blog post that also advocates for DeWayne Wise neck reduction.

Reading -- Spam2010_5.JPG  

Making Concessions

Reading -- Spam2010_4.JPG

Fade to Brown

Reading -- Spam2010_1.jpg

credit for the above three photographs: Jessica Kovalcin

Congratulations to all of those skilled in the art of Spam carving, whether they plied their trade on Saturday or in years past. For the record, my all-time favorite Spam sculpture to emanate from Reading is 2009’s “Demon Dog”.

Thumbnail image for Reading -- Spam -- Demon Dog!.JPG

benjamin.hill@mlb.com
twitter.com/bensbiz

Spam Artisans Return To Reading

In keeping with this week’s theme of getting right to the point, I now respectfully submit two photos from yesterday’s second annual Spam Carving Competition in Reading. Here, some of the more esteemed competitors stand in front of their creations:

Reading -- Spam Carve 2009 1.JPG 

So, from left to right, we have some sort of ramp, a Stonehenge-looking thing, several asymmetrical lumps, a demon dog, and a Phillies “P”. You know what, I’m going to have to zoom in for a closer look:

Demon Dog!

Reading -- Spam -- Demon Dog!.JPG 

Phillies “P”!

Reading -- Spam -- Phillies.JPG

The Rest!

Reading -- Spam -- The Rest.JPG

Actually, it was one of the the above entries that was declared winner. Over there, on the far right, is Mr. Jose Alicea’s sculpture of a living room.

Mr. Jose Alicea received an award for his creation:

Reading -- Spam Carve 2 (shot by Ralph Trout).JPG

(all photos: Rob Trout)

And now, because additional information is always appreciated, I present to you a sizable portion of Reading’s press release:

His
sculpture was a living room.

Alicea
works for Liberty Thrift Home Furnishing in Pottstown
and Collegeville and his work was his inspiration. 

Opportunity
House is a multi-service organization that improves the quality of life for
children, families and adults who face various obstacles to independence, and
supports their efforts to achieve and maintain self-sufficiency and well-being.

So, there you go. Spam was carved, money was raised, and everyone went home happy. Well, almost everyone.

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