Results tagged ‘ sports marketing ’

Pensacola Provokes Pedagogical Pursuits

I’ve written in the past about using Minor League Baseball as a tool to teach sports marketing at the high school and collegiate level, and have since heard from several teachers doing just this.

A particularly thorough example comes courtesy of Shawn Crull, who teaches a sports marketing class at Indiana’s Fishers High School. Inspired by this post on Pensacola’s “Name the Team” contest, Crull put together the following assignment:

Your Sports Marketing Company (you create a name) has been approached by the city of Pensacola, FL.  They have been awarded a AA minor league baseball team in the Southern League for 2012. The city has narrowed the nickname choices down to a final six – Redbones, Loggerheads, Blue Wahoos, Mullets, Aviators, and Salty Dogs.  That is where you and your colleagues come into the picture.

After selecting one of the names, the students were tasked with creating a team logo, mascot, uniforms, team website, and promotional events.  Some examples of the students’ work follows, presented as coherently as my file conversion skills would allow.

Update: More student uniform designs, many of them awesome, can be seen HERE. Crull’s own designs are HERE. The Pensacola club has since been named the Blue Wahoos, with Plan B Branding in charge of creating the logos and identity.

Loggerheads Logo

Loggerheads Mascot

Blue Wahoos Logo

Not-at-all terrifying Blue Wahoos mascot

Blue Wahoo Uniforms

Wahoo Opening Day Promotional Plan

Mullets Opening Day Promotion

So there you go –a great way to get students to engage with the proverbial “nuts and bolts” of a career in sports.

Crull wrote that his students really seemed to enjoy this assignment, and hopefully other educators will be inspired to follow suit. What I like best about projects such as these is that they get students thinking about a career in Minor League Baseball and what that would entail. When I was a student, the thought of working in this industry never occurred to me despite the fact that I was a huge baseball fan. A project such as the above may very well have provided the necessary motivation, saving me from years of unfocused occupational wandering in the process.

Thanks to Crull for getting in touch. Who will be next?

benjamin.hill@mlb.com

twitter.com/bensbiz

Teaching the Business of the Ballpark

Thumbnail image for cougars.gifI recently dedicated a post to the topic of using Minor League Baseball as a tool to teach sports marketing. This was inspired by the fact that high school teachers and college marketing professors regularly link to my blog, using the content therein to explain how the industry operates and why.

But my blog operates strictly in the digital realm. Offering a more hands-on experience are the Kane County Cougars, who last season began to offer a series of high school sports business seminars. Cougars director of public relations Shawn Touney writes:

[W]e provide a presentation at the ballpark and tangibly show them our operation and answer any questions they might have about how we market our product, career opportunities, and nearly everything in between. And obviously, it drives some revenue our way and taps into a demographic that goes unnoticed in many Minor League parks.

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I never would have guessed the response we would get…What began as setting aside a single seminar session time for an April noon game became a series of three dates, with 2 seminars scheduled for each of those 3 dates, to accommodate the schools who were interested in attending. When it was said and done, we had just under 1,000 students representing nearly 30 high schools throughout Chicagoland. Marketing classes, business classes, entrepreneurship classes, accounting classes – it ran the gamut. I couldn’t believe how many teachers were appreciative that something such as this was offered, which tells me that a lot of teams (big league clubs included) have not considered this.

This year, we’re offering something similar for each of our 7 noon games in April/May, with a staff-led seminar and ballgame to follow at noon. We will surpass last year’s numbers in terms of total attendance, number of participating schools, and revenue generated. The geography of the schools amazes me – we have schools  coming from a 75-minute driving radius for this. We will also be hosting some fall sports business seminars in late August/early September for fall semester classes, and actually have set aside a few college nights for sport management clubs and majors who are interested in learning more.

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After the presentation, the students are given supplementary materials that guide them toward viewing the ballgame from a business perspective. A sample problem:

You are a new business owner who is looking to make a splash in the Chicagoland area, bringing new customers and revenue to your business. You’re at the game this afternoon, and observing how many different opportunities there are to market your product to an audience. Here are two examples you notice:

Souvenir Giveaway

Outfield Billboard

List any other marketing opportunities for your business that you see or hear during the game.

And in 2011, the program will expand even further. Writes Touney:

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Reading your blog helped spawn an idea to make the event even more interactive, by having the schools, upon returning into the classroom, create a video presentation where they essentially come up with a between-innings promotion and explain not just how they’d market the promotion, but how they’d execute it as well. I don’t think we give high schoolers enough credit; their knowledge of popular trends, fads, insight on social media are just a few examples that come to mind.

Touney’s final point is one I agree with wholeheartedly — in addition to exposing the students to new concepts, the teams staging such seminars could benefit from the creative and culturally-relevant ideas offered by the students.

So how is else is doing/might do something of this nature? Let’s hear it!

Apologies that today’s post has been wonkier than Willie’s chocolate factory. To make up for it, here’s an artist’s rendering of the Reading Phillies’ highly-anticipated Carlos Ruiz “Chooching Owl” giveaway. Remember, this thing is actually going to say “Chooch.”

chooch.GIF

Oh, so it’s more you want, is it? Well, here’s footage of Charlie Sheen spoutin’ his bull to a Bull. Hornsby, the soon-to-be-revamped mascot of the Tulsa Drillers, really shows his range here.

As usual, I implore anyone to get in touch for any reason.

benjamin.hill@mlb.com
twitter.com/bensbiz

I Believe the Children Are Our Future Promoters

edbird.jpgLike any self-obsessed writer, I regularly check to see what websites have recently linked to my blog. Most of the time it’s random message board posters with an affinity for giant hamburgers, but occasionally the results are more interesting.

For example, last week I received several dozen hits from a high school teacher’s sports marketing blog. He asked his students to read my recent post on the Lowell Spinners’ “Human Home Run” stunt, and then write a two paragraph response explaining their thoughts on Minor League promotions as well as what sort of promotions they themselves would stage if put in a position to do so. The students’ answers, in the comments section, were not always feasible but certainly creative. A sampling:

I would bring a monster truck to my stadium/arena and it would go flying off a ramp. It would have to jump 6 school buses lined up next to each other. There would also be a huge ring of fire right in front of the ramp to make everything look crazy. The monster truck would have my team’s logo on it. It would be crazy and the place would be sold out.

Seeing that people will pay to watch risky situations. I would promote a pet skydiving. Idogdive.jpg would let dogs/cats land in the middle of the field before the game. This will honor animal abuse and will also bring fans to the stadium.

My idea would be to have player vs fan game. When the fans buy a ticket for the game they have a chance to enter contests. Then the fans will be picked at random to play a mini game with the players. I think if you give the players a chance to interact with the players it will attract more people.

I think it’s great that teachers are introducing such sports marketing concepts to high school students, as it could potentially get them interested in a Minor League Baseball career. To any high school teachers or college professors who read this blog — I will gladly assist your educational endeavors. Get in touch anytime.

Thumbnail image for milblogo.jpgAnd even more beneficial would be for teams to get involved. Wouldn’t it be great to invite students to the ballpark to take part in the conception and execution of a Minor League promo? While animal skydiving is probably not going to happen any time soon, it would be very interesting to see students’ ideas incorporated into gameday entertainment.

Just a thought. I’ve been known to have those once in a while.

And young promo progenitors would be more likely to come up with social media innovations, such as the Bowling Green Hot Rods’ Facebook Fan Night. This first-of-its kind promo is rolling right along — Facebook fans have selected the game time (6:35) and are now in the midst of picking the uniforms the team will wear that night.

And, predictably, the idea is catching on. Kane County and Stockton have recently announced their own version of the promo. Who’s next?

benjamin.hill@mlb.com
twitter.com/bensbiz

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